CORRELATION BETWEEN THE PHILIPPINE SCIENCE STUDENTS ... CORRELATION BETWEEN THE PHILIPPINE SCIENCE...

download CORRELATION BETWEEN THE PHILIPPINE SCIENCE STUDENTS ... CORRELATION BETWEEN THE PHILIPPINE SCIENCE STUDENTS’

of 12

  • date post

    24-Jun-2020
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    1
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of CORRELATION BETWEEN THE PHILIPPINE SCIENCE STUDENTS ... CORRELATION BETWEEN THE PHILIPPINE SCIENCE...

  • CORRELATION BETWEEN THE PHILIPPINE SCIENCE STUDENTS’ ANNUAL

    FAMILY INCOME AND CARBON FOOTPRINT

    Proponents:

    Amoncio, Hannah Joyce

    Batulan, Trenah Dyne

    Josol, Geremy Fe A.

    Langahid, Kathy Claire

    Ong, Dorothy Ann S.

    Pique, Kenny

    Taula, Japhet

    Yu, Marian Isabel D.

    Adviser:

    Michael A. Casas

    Philippine Science High School- Southern Mindanao Campus

    Davao City, Philippines

  • INTRODUCTION

    Climate change is one of the world’s greatest problems today. It is primarily caused by

    greenhouse gases that are trapped in the atmosphere. The most common greenhouse gas is

    carbon dioxide (CO2) that may be released artificially through the burning of fossil fuels, solid

    wastes and many others or naturally through the carbon cycle (Mogil, 2006). On the other hand,

    carbon emissions are increasing at an accelerated rate in these recent years because of human

    activities and industrialization.

    Carbon Footprint is the representation of the effect of an entity or organization on the

    Earth's climate in terms of the total amount of greenhouse gases produced expressed in units of

    carbon dioxide (WWF, 2012). This study aims to identify the activities that contribute greatly to

    the release of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere in order to identify solutions on how to reduce

    carbon emissions in the city. The purpose of this project is to determine the carbon footprint of

    PSHS students belonging to different scholarship categories and family income through by

    asking participants to answer a developed survey form. This provides a small scale, yet

    representative picture of how families belonging to different economic status vary in their carbon

    footprints.

    The different scholarship categories of students in PSHS-SMC are full, partial, and

    special. The classification of a student into any of the scholarship categories is dependent upon

    his/her socioeconomic bracket as determined from his/her parents' income tax returns and other

    indicators (e.g. family size, assets, liabilities, etc.) (Pisaybicol,2012).

  • METHODOLOGY:

    Four students belonging to each of the three scholarship categories from first year to fourth year

    high school were asked to answer the survey form. After which, the proponents collated the data,

    tabulated the results and converted the answers of the students to kilograms carbon dioxide using

    CRAG’s Carbon Footprinting Worksheet. The survey form that the participants filled out is

    shown below.

    Name: Year and Section: Scholarship Category: FROM DECEMBER 2011 TO FEBRUARY 2012 ELECTRICITY

    December 2011 January 2012 February 2012

    Kilowatt hour (kWh) of conventional energy

    CAR ( If any ) Enter the total ____ you consumed for the past months

    December 2011` January 2012 February 2012

    Litres petrol

    Gallons petrol

    Litres diesel

    Gallons diesel

    OR

    Petrol Car: How Many:

    Total Kilometers: December 2011 January 2012 February 2012

    Small

    Medium

    Large

    Diesel Car: How Many:

    Total Kilometers: December 2011 January 2012 February 2012

    Small

    Large

    LPG Car: How Many:

    Total Kilometers: December 2011 January 2012 February 2012

    Any size

    Public Transport

    Specify mode/s of transport: From ____ to _______: How many times a day?

    Jeepney

    Bus

    Taxi

    Have you travelled by plane during December 2011 to February 2012? If so, from what location and to where?

  • Table 2: CRAG’s Carbon Footprinting Worksheet

    CALCULATE YOUR CO2 EMISSIONS

    Enter in this column

    amount of fuel used or

    distance travelled.

    Then multiply it by the number in this column to find how many kg of

    CO2 that makes and enter that in the next

    column.*

    Personal CO2 Emissions Subtotals

    (in kg of CO2)

    HEATING

    GAS Enter a figure for just one of the following!

    New style units (Cubic metres) of mains gas 2.2

    Old style units (100's cubic feet) of mains gas 6.2

    Kilowatt hours (kWh) equivalent 0.206

    COAL One sack of coal usually weighs 50kg

    Kilogrammes of Domestic coal 2.5

    HEATING OIL Enter a figure for just one of the following!

    Litres of heating oil 3

    Gallons of heating oil 13.6

    WOOD PELLETS

    Per tonne 132

    ELECTRICITY

    Kilowatt hours (kWh) of electricity (including all green

    tariffs) 0.55

    * Remember to divide by number of people in household

    for heating and electricity.

    CAREnter a figure for the relevant fuel(s) in litres or

    gallons!

    Litres petrol 2.3

    Gallons petrol 10.4

    Litres diesel 2.7

    Gallons diesel 12.2

    Litres LPG 1.5

    Gallons LPG 6.7

    OR enter your miles or kilometers according to your car type

    Small petrol car up to 1.4 litre engine

    Kilometers 0.18

    Miles 0.29

    Medium petrol car 1.4 to 2.0 litre engine

    Kilometers 0.21

    Miles 0.34

    Large petrol car Over 2.0 litre

    Kilometers 0.30

    Miles 0.48

    Small diesel car up to 1.7 litre engine

    Kilometers 0.15

    Miles 0.24

    Mediul diesel car 1.7 to 2.0 litre engine

    Kilometres 0.19

  • Miles 0.30

    Large diesel car over 2.0 litre engine

    Kilometers 0.26

    Miles 0.42

    LPG or CNG car

    Kilometres 0.22

    Miles 0.36

    Medium Petrol Hydrid

    Kilometres 0.13

    Miles 0.20

    Large Petrol Hybrid

    Kilometres 0.22

    PLANE enter the flight distance in kilometers or miles

    Kilometers 0.51

    Miles 0.82

    OR use http://www.chooseclimate.org/ to calculate

    emissions for each flight and record total

    GRAND TOTAL (kg CO2) FROM HOUSE AND TRANSPORT

    (N.B. If required, divide

    grand total by 1000 to get

    total in tonnes of CO2 and

    then by 3.67 to get total in

    tonnes of Carbon)

  • RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

    Table 3 below presents the electric consumption, private and public transportation, and

    airplane services availed by the students’ families during the months of December 2011 to

    February 2012. Graph 1 is also a presentation of the carbon emissions presented in a bar

    graph.

    Table 3: Differences in carbon footprint of students based on their electrical consumption,

    private and public transportation, and airplane services of full, partial, and special scholars

    Scholarship

    Category

    Year Level

    of Student

    Respondent

    CO2 Emission(kg)

    Electri-

    city

    (kg)

    Private

    Transpo-

    rtation

    (kg)

    Public

    Transpo-

    rtation

    (kg)

    Airplane

    Services

    (kg)

    Total

    Emission

    (kg)

    Grand

    Total

    (kg)

    Full

    Average for

    1 st Year

    120 0 30.38 0 150.38

    138.504

    Average for

    2nd Year 90 0 30.38 0 120.38

    Average for

    3 rd

    Year 125 0 30.38 0 155.38

    Average for

    4 th

    Year 73.5 0 54.376 0 127.876

    Partial

    Average for

    1 st Year

    145 47.6 19.6 0 212.2

    230.1995

    Average for

    2 nd

    Year 91 95.2 2.73 0 188.93

    Average for

    3 rd

    Year 235.5 0 54.376 0 289.876

    Average for

    4 th

    Year 54.5 167.9 7.392 0 229.792

    Special

    Average for

    1 st Year

    650 624 0 1316.718 2590.718

    2615.5523

    Average for

    2 nd

    Year 447 2295.72 0 1316.718 4059.438

    Average for

    3 rd

    Year 256 0 30.38 1316.718 1603.098

    Average for

    4 th

    Year 347 540 5.237 1316.718 2208.955

  • Graph 1: Differences in carbon footprints of students from different scholarship categories

    The classification of a student into any of the scholarship categories is dependent upon

    his/her socio-economic bracket as determined by the Scholarship Categorization Committee

    based on economic indicators (Pisaybicol, 2012). The amount of CO2 contributed to the

    atmosphere by the individuals interviewed was calculated using the CO2 conversion spreadsheet

    by Carbon Rationing Action Groups (CRAG) as seen in Table 2. The data was retrieved from the

    survey conducted to 48 students with four students from each year level per scholarship

    category. The grand total of the carbon emission of full scholars was 138.504 kg, 230.1995 kg for

    the partial scholars and the special scholars released 2,615.5523 kg as presented in Table 3. A difference

    of 2,477.0483 kg was computed between the carbon footprint of full and special scholars while a

    0

    500

    1000

    1500